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Thread: Exhumations in 4 local unsolved deaths to begin next week

  1. #1

    atombomb Exhumations in 4 local unsolved deaths to begin next week

    http://timesleader.com/news/589776/e...egin-next-week

    State police investigators next week will begin their efforts to crack four local unsolved deaths on the heels of forensic strides made in five other cold cases across the state.
    The Times Leader reported last month that the unidentified remains of four people, whose deaths are considered either homicides or highly suspicious, will be exhumed Monday from their burial sites in cemeteries in Courtdale and Hanover Township in a widespread effort to identify the victims using modern forensic tools.
    Investigators say in a news release Friday facial reconstructions and/or chemical isotope testing have been completed in cases in five counties, including a woman whose skeletal remains were discovered in 1994 during a mine reclamation project in Sugarloaf Township.


    According to the Times Leader archives, the skeleton was found in the woods near a dirt road about 300 yards from Tomhicken Road. The woman is believed to be between the ages of 34 and 47, according to investigators.
    Similar advances have been made in cases in Carbon, Lebanon, Monroe and York counties, investigators say.
    State Police Cpl. Thomas McAndrew identified the cold cases and will lead the re-opened investigations through a federal grant provided by the National Institute of Justice. He will be assisted by renowned forensic anthropologist Dr. Erin Kimmerle and a team of colleagues from the University of South Florida.
    The local cases:
    • Interstate 81 Jane Doe (1970)
    Authorities on Sept. 28, 1970, discovered the nude, badly decomposed body of a woman about a mile south of the Nuangola exit on Interstate 81, about 35-feet into a wooded area on the west side of the southbound lane, according to newspaper reports at the time.
    • Interstate 80 Jane Doe (1973)
    A woman’s body was found Aug. 9, 1973, along Interstate 80 in Black Creek Township wrapped in a blanket and doused with sulfuric acid. The woman, a black female, was between the the ages of 21 and 30, was about 5 feet tall and weighed about 100 lbs., according to a newspaper report the following day.
    • Bear Creek John Doe (1979)
    Two men on their way to a fishing hole in Bear Creek Township on May 28, 1979, discovered the partially decomposed remains of a white male between the ages of 25 and 4o who had been shot in the chest. His death was ruled a homicide.
    • Baby Boy John Doe (1980)
    A worker unloading trash at the now-closed West Side Landfill discovered the body of an infant boy among the trash. Investigators believe the boy was discarded 24 to 72 hours after being born. His death was ruled a homicide.
    The baby boy’s burial site is marked with a small stone plaque in an isolated corner of St. Anthony’s Cemetery in Courtdale. The other victims are buried at Maple Hill Cemetery in Hanover Township.
    The exhumations are slated to begin at both sites at 10 a.m.
    State police ask anyone with information on the cases or victims to contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-4PA-TIPS. Tips can also be submitted online at www.crimewatchpa.com/crimestoppers.




    Last edited by Starless; 09-24-2016 at 10:19 AM.

  2. #2

    atombomb Black Creek cold case among 4 bodies exhumed by state police

    http://standardspeaker.com/news/blac...lice-1.2094968

    The remains of an unidentified woman found wrapped in a blanket and doused with sulfuric acid along Interstate 80 in Black Creek Township in 1973 is among four bodies state police investigators will have exhumed on Monday.
    State police will work with a forensic anthropologist from the University of South Florida to further these cold case homicide investigations using modern forensic science, such as facial reconstructions, chemical isotope testing and collection of DNA samples, which can be entered into a national database in hopes of linking reference samples from family members of missing persons.
    Through a federal grant administered by the National Institute of Justice, Dr. Erin Kimmerle, director of the Institute for Forensic Anthropology & Applied Science, will be able to conduct the exhumations and examine the bodies.
    To date, assistance has been provided on five cold investigations from Monroe, Carbon, Luzerne, Lebanon and York counties. Four additional cases from Luzerne County will be added to that list.
    Cpl. Thomas C. McAndrew, a member of the Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit which routinely attempts to further cold case homicide investigations, selected the new cold cases.
    They include the 1973 case in which a motorist found the partially decomposed body of a black female on the side of Interstate 80 westbound in Black Creek Township. She was wearing blue-green shorts, a pink blouse with lace trim and blue and green slippers with a floral design.
    The second case is the nude body of a black female found along Interstate 81 southbound in Rice Township near Nuangola in 1970.
    The third case, from 1979, is the partially decomposed remains of a white male found by two men who were walking to a fishing spot in Bear Creek Township. The victim was estimated to be between 25 and 40 years old, and was wearing a sterling silver bracelet with “Vedon” on the clasp and 14-karat gold serpent design ring on the pinky finger.
    The fourth case involves the body of a newborn baby boy found by a landfill worker among trash in Larksville in 1980. The baby was a white male born 24 to 72 hours prior to discovery.
    The exhumations will begin Monday at 10 a.m. at Maple Hill Cemetery in Hanover Township and St. Anthony’s Cemetery in Courtdale. A follow-up press conference will be held Wednesday at 10 a.m. at state police headquarters in Harrisburg.
    Facial reconstruction and chemical isotope testing have been completed on four other cold case victims, and chemical isotope testing on a fifth. They include the remains of a pregnant female who had been sexually assaulted, dismembered, placed in three suitcases and thrown from an Interstate 80 bridge in East Side borough in 1976 and the skeletonized remains of a white female between 34 and 47 years old found by workers in Sugarloaf Township in 1994.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Black Creek cold case among 4 bodies exhumed by state police

    Beth Doe is among them. I hope they can extract DNA from the fetus en maybe figure out who the father is.


    9 cases mentioned in the article below:


    State police, anthropologist exhume remains, investigate cold-case homicides

    The State Police has teamed with a forensic anthropologist from the University of South Florida to investigate cold-case homicides across the state.

    To identify victims and help loved ones find closure, forensic anthropologist Erin Kimmerle has recently worked with state police on five cold case investigations in Carbon, Lebanon, Luzerne, Monroe and York Counties. She now plans to assists with four additional cases stemming from Luzerne County, police said.

    State police Cpl. Thomas C. McAndrew, a member of the Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit, has helped locate unidentified victims buried across the state.

    McAndrew identified four such cases in Luzerne County, according to police. And through a federal grant from the National Institute of Justice, Kimmerle will exhume the bodies at Maple Hill Cemetery in Hanover Township and at St. Anthony's Cemetery in Courtdale Monday, police said.

    To help identify the victims, investigators could conduct facial reconstructions, chemical isotope testing and collect DNA samples to be submitted to a national database to help link them to family of missing people, police said.

    Police and Kemmerle have worked on the following cases:

    Case 1: 1973 - Two game commission officers found the partially decomposed remains of a female near Fort Indiantown Gap, Union Township, Lebanon County. The victim was nude and covered with green plastic tarps and leaves. She is estimated to be a white female between 13 – 19 years of age. A facial reconstruction and chemical isotope testing have been completed.

    Also see: http://www.officialcoldcaseinvestiga...Indiantown+Gap

    Case 2: 2013 – A tree-trimming crew discovered a human skull near the West Manchester Mall in West Manchester Township, York County. This led to the discovery of additional skeletal remains. Police believe the remains belonged to a white, Hispanic or Asian male between the ages of 30-50. Investigators estimate that his remains were there three to 10 years before they were discovered. A facial reconstruction and chemical isotope analysis have been completed.

    Case 3: 1994 – Workers at a mine reclamation project discovered a human skull in the woods in Sugarloaf Township, Luzerne County. Additional skeletal remains also were found. The victim is believed to be a white female between the ages of 34-47. Investigators have completed a facial reconstruction and chemical isotope analysis.

    Case 4: 1976 - A teenage boy who was playing along the banks of the Lehigh River in East Side Borough, Carbon County, found the remains of a pregnant female. The victim had been sexually assaulted, dismembered, placed in three suitcases and thrown off of a bridge along Interstate 80. A facial reconstruction and chemical isotope testing have been completed.

    Also see: http://www.officialcoldcaseinvestiga...H-and-BABY-DOE

    Case 5: 2011 - A person walking along Route 191 in Paradise Township, Monroe County, found the remains of a male wrapped inside four black garbage bags. Police believe the victim was killed within two months of the discovery. Chemical isotope testing was completed.

    The bodies to be exhumed Monday stem from the following cases:

    Case 6: 1973 – A driver found the partially decomposed remains of a black female on the side of Interstate 80 westbound in Black Creek Township, Luzerne County. The victim was wearing blue-green shorts, a pink blouse with lace trim, and blue & green slippers with a floral design. She was wrapped in a blanket and doused with sulfuric acid.

    Case 7: 1970 - The nude body of a black female was found along Interstate 81 south near Nuangola, Rice Township, Luzerne County.

    Case 8: 1979 – The partially decomposed remains of a white male were found by two men who were walking to a fishing spot. The victim is believed to be between the ages of 25-40 years. She was wearing a sterling silver bracelet with "Vedon" on the clasp and a 14k gold serpent design ring on his pinky finger.

    Case 9: 1980 – A landfill worker found the body of a white newborn baby boy among trash in Larksville Borough, Luzerne County. Police believe the baby was born 24 to 72 hours before the discovery.

    Anyone who can help identify the victims or provide information about these cases is asked to contact Pennsylvania Crime Stoppers at 1-800-4PA-TIPS, or submit tips at the crime stoppers website.

    Anyone who provides information to Crime Stoppers that leads to an arrest could be eligible for a cash reward.



    http://www.pennlive.com/news/2016/09...th_forens.html



    Case 8, victim is male and she was wearing a bracelet and a ring on his pinky finger? Guess the "she" is a mistake.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Black Creek cold case among 4 bodies exhumed by state police

    This is really extraordinary!!! These are some really great human beings to do so much hard work like this. Very good news!!!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Black Creek cold case among 4 bodies exhumed by state police

    I hope they will get some results, and they are trying, that's a good thing for sure! Hope they can bring some of them home!! Good luck to them, fingers crossed!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Black Creek cold case among 4 bodies exhumed by state police

    A state policeman's crusade to stop digging up the long dead



    WILKES-BARRE - At the foot of a gentle slope dotted with small American flags, a backhoe scraped at the coarse soil until it hit stone.

    A few dozen people helped haul the lid of a heavy vault from the cemetery dirt. Beneath it lay a metal casket.

    Inside the casket was an autopsy bag. And inside the autopsy bag was the body of a woman, found dead, doused in sulfuric acid, and wrapped in a blanket on a lonely stretch of I-80 in Luzerne County nearly a half-century ago.

    Dr. Erin Kimmerle, a trowel shoved into her back pocket, climbed out of an open grave a few feet away and walked over to watch as investigators drilled through the metal casket and lifted its contents into a white body bag. Behind her, the backhoe was already digging at a third grave.

    Kimmerle, a forensic anthropologist from the University of Florida, had traveled to the heart of Pennsylvania's coal country Monday for a task she knew might prove futile: exhuming the bodies of four nameless homicide victims and subjecting them to DNA and other evidence testing in the hopes that they might be identified and their killers found.

    She was there at the behest of Cpl. Tom McAndrew, a homicide investigator for the state police, who, several years ago, caught the 1973 case of the I-80 victim. The odds of solving so cold a case are thin: "Maybe one in 10,000," he guessed. But exhumation was the only way forward.

    "We can't apply current, modern science unless we dig them up," McAndrew said.

    But what McAndrew really wants is to stop having to dig those bodies up at all. He's part of an increasingly vocal group of law enforcement officials pushing for laws that would standardize the way coroners and police deal with unidentified bodies.

    In most states there's no law, he said, "telling [coroners] that they have to get DNA samples, and keep dental records, and save hair," or a mandate for coroners to enter details about an unidentified body into NAMUS, the federal database that tracks missing people and unidentified bodies, cross-checking the lists for matches.

    Many agencies, of course, do this on their own. In Philadelphia, DNA evidence has been saved for nearly all of the 49 unidentified bodies found in the city over the years and listed on NAMUS. The Philadelphia Police Department also submits information to federal databases on every missing person in the city.

    In general, Pennsylvania officials are "very progressive" when it comes to working with NAMUS, even without a law requiring them to do so, said Todd Matthews, the database's director of communications and case management.

    But of the estimated 40,000 unidentified bodies across the country, only 13,986 have been entered into NAMUS since it was launched in 2007.

    A name has been put to just over 2,000 of those bodies.

    "The best thing the public can do for us is letting us know what we don't know," Matthews said. "It's sad to have to pass a law to make that happen, but maybe you do."

    The victims exhumed this week in Luzerne County were found long before NAMUS's creation, long before DNA testing was even a concept. Now, that evidence will be entered into the database - DNA from the woman in the blanket on I-80; from the man with a pinkie ring found near a fishing hole in 1979; from the woman dumped nude on I-81 in 1970; and from the last body unearthed on Monday, that of a newborn boy found in a landfill in Larksville in 1980.

    The county had buried him in an unmarked grave in a small cemetery at the end of a winding road. Locals later raised money for a headstone, placed in the approximate vicinity of the grave.

    Kimmerle and her team dug for some time before they hit the tiny autopsy bag. It was placed in a coroner's van and whisked off to a forensic unit, where Kimmerle, McAndrews, and other investigators would be spending the next several days examining the bodies, submitting what evidence they found, and hoping against the odds.

    "It's a privilege, really," Kimmerle said. "It's not the biggest problem in the whole world - but when you're missing your child or parent, that is your whole world. And we try to make that difference."


    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20...long_dead.html

  7. #7

    Default Re: Black Creek cold case among 4 bodies exhumed by state police

    Investigators release cold-case death facial reconstruction photos


    http://citizensvoice.com/news/invest...otos-1.2107198

    WILKES-BARRE — Investigators released facial reconstruction photos in three cold-case deaths Friday, a month after their bodies were exhumed in an effort to breathe new life into the cases.
    Over the summer, state police and county prosecutors got court orders allowing them to exhume the bodies of four people who died under suspicious circumstances — corpses known only as “I-81 Jane Doe,” “Bear Creek John Doe,” “I-80 Jane Doe” and “Baby Boy Doe.”
    Investigators used federal grants that fund DNA testing to identify missing people as they partnered with University of South Florida forensic anthropologist Dr. Erin Kimmerle in an effort to see if new scientific techniques can help solve the deaths of the victims, who died more than three decades ago.
    In releasing the reconstruction photos Friday, investigators said they hope someone will recognize the faces, leading to an identification that would be a huge step toward solving the crimes.
    The first victim was “I-81 Jane Doe,” whose naked body was found in a wooded area to the west of the southbound lanes of Interstate 81 in Rice Township on Sept. 28, 1970. An autopsy determined the woman’s body had been at the site for two or three days, but the cause and manner of death were undetermined.
    On Aug. 9, 1973, the body of “I-80 Jane Doe” was discovered along the west travel lanes of I-80 in Black Creek Township. The death was “extremely suspicious,” prosecutors said, but the cause and manner of death in that case also remained undetermined.
    The death of “Bear Creek John Doe,” in contrast, was clearly a homicide, according to prosecutors. His partially decomposed body was found May 28, 1979, in a wooded area off state Route 2041 in Bear Creek Township. An autopsy determined the man had been shot in the chest between 10 days and two weeks earlier, according to court records.
    The other case investigators are working as part of the effort is the death of “Baby Boy Doe,” whose body was found in the West Side Landfill in Larksville on Aug. 6, 1980 — about three days after being born. The child’s death was also ruled a homicide.
    Anyone with information about the cases is asked to call state police.
    Last edited by Starless; 10-22-2016 at 03:30 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Exhumations in 4 local unsolved deaths to begin next week

    1979 case Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #9

    Default Re: Exhumations in 4 local unsolved deaths to begin next week

    1973 case Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #10

    Default Re: Exhumations in 4 local unsolved deaths to begin next week

    1970 case Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1970 case.PNG 
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