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Thread: William Reece

  1. #1

    mystery William Reece

    Great write-up here and not too over-the-top to believe he may have involvement in other I-45 cases too that he has not confessed to yet.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ppearance.html

  2. #2

    Default Re: William Reece

    http://www.star-telegram.com/news/lo...e68682432.html

    FORT WORTH Directed by a convicted kidnapper, authorities will start digging at a location in Brazoria County in coastal Texas for the remains of a missing University of North Texas honor student, according to Houston area news outlets and authorities.


    A Denton investigator was at the scene Monday, but Denton police declined to make any additional comments, only saying that convict William Reece was a “person of interest” in the 1997 disappearance of Kelli Cox.
    “We’ve had brief talks with him,” Denton police spokesman Shane Kizer said Monday.
    Texas Department of Public Safety Sgt. William Kennard said Monday that authorities had not started digging, and he didn’t know when they would begin.
    Reece also is a suspect in several other cases. The Houston man has been in prison since 1998, but he has been accompanying authorities in recent days to searches in the Houston area for missing young victims, according to Houston area news outlets.
    Last edited by Starless; 03-30-2016 at 08:00 AM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: William Reece

    Investigators look to conclude dig after remains are found

    http://thefacts.com/free_share/artic...e88ac5127.html

    ROSHARON — Texas Rangers will continue searching an area off Highway 288 throughout the week in attempts to conclude an investigation into the disappearance of a Denton woman.
    Investigators announced Tuesday they discovered human remains in a field off Highway 288 near CR 51. The bones were discovered Friday, according to a news release from the Texas Rangers.
    Authorities determined the bones were human, but have not confirmed the identity, the news release states.
    Investigators did not comment on what type of bones were found, the condition of them or if it was a full skeleton.
    Denton Police Officer Shane Kizer said in a news release that authorities are testing the bones to see if they belong to Kelli Cox, a Denton woman who has been missing since 1997. She was 20 years old.
    “The Denton Police Department cannot say definitively that the remains recovered are Cox. However, we are hopeful that they are,” Kizer said.
    Authorities have not released any additional information because of the ongoing investigation.
    The excavation began March 29 after William Reece directed investigators to the site. Reece is a suspect in the disappearance of Cox.
    Reece also is a suspect in the abduction and murder of Jessica Cain, a 17-year-old who also vanished in 1997.
    Remains were found during a dig March 18 in a field in southern Houston while investigators were searching for the body of Cain. Tests have not yet identified those remains.
    Reece was sentenced in 1998 for the 1997 kidnapping of Sandra Sapaugh, and currently is serving a 60-year prison sentence.
    In addition to being a suspect in the disappearances of both Cox and Cain, Reece also is a “person of interest” in the death of 12-year-old Laura Smither, who disappeared while jogging April 3, 1997, in Friendswood. Her body was found April 20, 1997, in a retention pond in Pasadena.
    Reece was charged in September 2015 with the 1997 abduction and murder of 19-year-old Tiffany Johnston in Bethany, Oklahoma. Advancements in DNA testing led to the charges.
    As the search for Cox’s remains continues, Texas EquuSearch Director Tim Miller said his organization is returning today to assist.
    Authorities are satisfied with the discovery, and searchers will continue looking within the about two-mile area they have been digging for the next day or two, Miller said.
    Investigators will be wrapping up the excavation but will remain on site in case more is found, he said.
    “I’m sure they’re still sifting, and we have a lot of cleanup to do, equipment to get back,” Miller said.
    Despite investigators discovering the remains within county lines, the Brazoria County Sheriff’s Office will not take over the investigation, Sheriff Charles Wagner.
    The Texas Rangers will continue to conduct to the investigation, Wagner said.
    Wagner said the Brazoria County Sheriff’s Office duties will conclude when the Rangers finish the dig.
    “The Rangers have worked everything,” he said. “We’ll leave it up to them.”
    Although the investigation is out of the hands of the county sheriff, the district attorney’s office will coordinate with the Denton County district attorney to assist in building a case against Reece, Brazoria County District Attorney Jeri Yenne said.
    This type of coordination is common when remains related to a case are found in another county, Yenna said.
    “My office will be coordinating with the place of the original investigation, which is Denton County,” she said.

  4. #4

    Default Re: William Reece

    http://www.star-telegram.com/news/lo...e71152227.html

    Skeletal remains found in Brazoria County are those of University of North Texas honor student Kelli Cox, who went missing in 1997, Denton police said Monday.
    Dental records confirmed that the bones were those of Cox, who was last seen in Denton.


    Cox’s mother, Jan Bynum of Farmers Branch said Monday in a telephone interview that Denton police alerted her that authorities had made a preliminary identification a few days ago.
    “They wanted to be 100 percent sure, so tests were done over the weekend,” Bynum said Monday. “The detective called me this morning.”
    Now, she said, “I’m dealing with a whole new set of emotions. It’s difficult.”


    The remains were analyzed by University of North Texas/Center for Human Identification and Laboratory Forensic Anthropology and the Galveston County medical examiner’s office, officials said.
    Authorities found them April 5 at a site in Brazoria County. Convict William Reece led authorities to the area where he said he buried the missing UNT student, Cox’s mother has said.
    The remains were found in a pasture off Texas 288 near Rosharon.
    Denton police spokesman Shane Kizer said the identification means investigators are conducting a homicide investigation and they are looking to file formal charges.
    Cox disappeared July 15, 1997, after taking a tour of the Denton Jail with her UNT criminology class. She called her boyfriend about noon and when he arrived to meet her he found only her car.
    Bynum said she remembered hearing Reece’s name early in the investigation, but he was never arrested in the Cox case. He had worked as a truck driver and bulldozer operator in the Houston area.
    Cox had a 19-month-old daughter, who is now a student at UNT.


    Bynum said she told her granddaughter Monday, and encouraged her to attend classes.
    “I told her if anyone asked, and she didn’t want to talk about it, that she didn’t have to say a word,” Bynum said.
    Before this week, Cox was legally declared presumed dead.
    Reece was sentenced to 60 years in prison in 1998 for an aggravated kidnapping in Harris County, according to Texas Department of Criminal Justice records. While in prison, he was also sentenced to three years for theft in Brazoria County.
    He was charged in September with the murder and kidnapping in Oklahoma of 19-year-old Tiffany Johnston, who was abducted on July 26, 1997, from a car wash in Bethany, Okla. He was charged in that case after DNA evidence linked him to the crimes.
    In late February and last month, Reece has guided authorities to locations near Houston. He led them to a pasture in southeast Houston where human remains were found March 18. Medical examiners are working to identify the skeletal remains, which could be those of missing 17-year-old Jessica Cain of La Marque.
    Reece is a suspect in her August 1997 disappearance and in the murder that same year of Laura Smither, 12, of Friendswood.
    Smither disappeared while jogging, and her body was found a month later in Pasadena, according to multiple news outlets in Houston.


    Bynum said she plans to visit the site in Brazoria County where her daughter’s remains were found. She’s been in contact with the property owner.
    “We are going to bring her home now,” Bynum said. “She’s in God’s arms.”




    Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/news/lo...#storylink=cpy

    The remains were analyzed by University of North Texas/Center for Human Identification and Laboratory Forensic Anthropology and the Galveston County medical examiner’s office, officials said.
    Authorities found them April 5 at a site in Brazoria County. Convict William Reece led authorities to the area where he said he buried the missing UNT student, Cox’s mother has said.
    The remains were found in a pasture off Texas 288 near Rosharon.
    Denton police spokesman Shane Kizer said the identification means investigators are conducting a homicide investigation and they are looking to file formal charges.
    Cox disappeared July 15, 1997, after taking a tour of the Denton Jail with her UNT criminology class. She called her boyfriend about noon and when he arrived to meet her he found only her car.
    Bynum said she remembered hearing Reece’s name early in the investigation, but he was never arrested in the Cox case. He had worked as a truck driver and bulldozer operator in the Houston area.
    Cox had a 19-month-old daughter, who is now a student at UNT.



    Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/news/lo...#storylink=cpy


  5. #5

    Default Re: William Reece

    Who is William Reece? Insight into a suspected serial killer


    At the prompting of William Reece, a suspected serial killer, investigators continue to dig for human remains in Brazoria County.

    Reece is a man who has spent half his life locked up for sexual assaults and kidnapping. While court records and police reports detail his crimes, what’s the story behind the Oklahoma native?

    Those are answers that true crime novelist Kathryn Casey shed light on.

    In what was a unique relationship between novelist and convict, Casey shared some of the many letters that Reece had written to her after a jailhouse interview in 2013.

    “I went into the prison and sat down to talk to Bill Reece, which was a fairly disturbing experience,” Casey said. “He is a very cold, very calculating—a very manipulative man. At the same time—at other times, he was laughing and he was charming and he was very much the psychopath.”

    Reece’s criminal past stretches back decades. In 1986, he kidnapped his first known victim at the side of an Oklahoma highway.

    “He had her perform sexual acts and he duct-taped her and zipped her up into a sleeping bag. She very wisely talked her way out of it,” Casey said. “The odd thing was that once he had done this to her, he talked to her about wanting to marry her.”

    That victim was able to escape and Reece was charged, but his crimes didn’t end there.

    “While he was under indictment on that case, he crawled in a window at another woman's home after seeing her at a bar and sexually assaulted her,” Casey said.

    Reece was sentenced to 25 years in prison but, according to Casey, because of a technicality flaw he only served 10 years and was released in 1996.

    Casey says Reece grew up in the country outside Oklahoma City and was part of a fairly well respected middle-class family. His mother, father and sister died during his most recent stint in prison.

    “At that point he had a sister and an ex-wife who were both living in the Houston area and Bill Reece relocated to Houston,” Casey said.

    A few months later, girls began to disappear. In April 1997, 12-year-old Laura Smither of Friendswood vanished. Her body was later found in a Pasadena pond.

    Then months later, on July 15, Kelli Cox from Denton, Texas, disappeared. Authorities are currently digging for her possible remains in a private field in Brazoria County.

    Eleven days later, Tiffany Johnston disappeared from Oklahoma—her body was also found. After 18 years, there was a break in the case that connected Reece and he was charged with Johnston’s murder.

    “In the Johnson case, they did find semen, which is where they got the DNA,” Casey said.

    And then there’s Jessica Cain, the 17-year-old La Marque girl who vanished after attending a theater cast party with friends.

    In March of this year, Reece was spotted leading authorities around in a southeast Houston field, telling them where to dig for Cain’s remains. On March 18, remains were found; however, autopsy results are pending to determine if they’re Cain’s remains. ( Article is dated March 2016, Jessica Cain is identified http://www.officialcoldcaseinvestiga...7-Galveston-TX )

    Reece is currently in prison on a kidnapping conviction from 1997. That victim was able to escape. The question many people are asking: Why is Reece helping now?

    “My understanding is he does not want to go to Oklahoma where the case is a death penalty case and that he is cooperating now with Texas officials, maybe to forestall that,” Casey said.

    Authorities are staying tight lipped about why Reece is talking, but Casey believes it has nothing to do with remorse.

    “He is a cold-blooded calculated psychopath and whatever he's doing he's doing for Bill Reece,” she said.



    http://www.khou.com/news/crime/who-i...ller/112797820

  6. #6

    Default Re: William Reece

    Finding remains of missing women required exhaustive search


    HOUSTON — Shovels and flashlights in hand on a night in mid-February, investigators restarted the search nearly two decades after the girls went missing.

    It would end about six weeks later, with two of the largest excavation sites for human remains ever, forensic anthropologist experts said, a demonstration of effort by multiple agencies and community members to find Kelli Ann Cox and Jessica Cain. Both disappeared in the summer of 1997.

    While the Texas Rangers have led the criminal investigation, the Friendswood Police Department oversaw the excavation operation at sites in Brazoria County and Houston — from digging methods to flying in specialized dogs from California to enlisting help from volunteers who donated construction equipment.

    The FBI, La Marque and Denton police departments, and Brazoria County and Galveston County sheriff’s offices, along with Texas Equusearch, a nonprofit dedicated to finding missing people, also helped at the sites.

    Friendswood police Capt. Josh Rogers, who coordinated excavation efforts at both sites, remembers an outpouring of community involvement in the initial searches in 1997, when Cain vanished and Laura Smither, a 12-year-old Friendswood girl, disappeared and was later found dead.

    “What’s kind of interesting is that’s the way it happened over the past couple of months, too,” Rogers told The Galveston County Daily News (http://bit.ly/21q4v5l ).

    Rogers and those who donated time and resources to the recovery of Cox and Cain were scheduled to be recognized at a Friendswood City Council meeting.

    On Feb. 15, investigators and William Lewis Reece, a convicted kidnapper serving a 60-year prison sentence, went to a field off state Highway 288 and County Road 51 in Brazoria County. Earlier that day, Reece had been released from prison in Huntsville on a bench warrant to assist in the investigation.

    They didn’t plan to find anything as the evening grew dark, but law enforcement needed to move quickly after an interview with Reece, Rogers said.

    “When someone is cooperating, you want to adjust your schedule to theirs,” he said. “You do it when they’re ready to cooperate.”

    A multiyear investigation in Oklahoma led to that first night of digging in Brazoria County. In September, prosecutors in Oklahoma County had charged Reece with murder and kidnapping in the July 1997 death of 19-year-old Tiffany Johnston, whose body was found alongside a road in Canadian County, Okla., which borders Oklahoma County.

    Oklahoma investigators and the Friendswood Police Department have been communicating since August 2014, Police Chief Bob Wieners said. Oklahoma law enforcement requested information from Friendswood police, who had a timeline of Reece’s whereabouts in 1997 because the agency had investigated the death of Smither, Wieners said.

    For years, investigators have considered Reece a “person of interest” in the deaths of both Smither and Cain.

    Initially, investigators searched the rough terrain of the Brazoria County field, using shovels, a small track hoe and small excavator. It became clear the search would take more than a few hours or couple of days, Rogers said. Eventually, the field in Brazoria County would yield the bones of Cox, a 20-year-old woman who disappeared from Denton in July 1997.

    But after the first week of unsuccessful searching, the multiagency team moved its operation to a horse pasture about 30 miles north in Houston to search for Cain.

    The Houston search began with Reece pointing to specific areas on the ground, Rogers said. But in the last two decades, the site has changed; the property had been divided into three parcels, and structures and fence lines were moved, Rogers said. Overlaying aerial photography from 1997 on top of images from the current layout, investigators tried to narrow down a location. They also used cadaver dogs and ground-penetrating radar.

    But the strategy changed to a systematic “strip-mining” technique over a 75,000-square-foot area — significantly larger than the size of a football field. In some places, they dug as deep as 8 feet. By the fourth week of searching, a movement was underway to borrow larger excavators from construction contractors in the area.

    Mark Boyer, who owns Houston-based Boyer Inc., donated equipment.

    “It was quite an endeavor — like looking for a needle in a haystack,” Boyer said. “I know it’s tough on budgets, and these people have limited resources.”

    Because the normal cadaver dogs didn’t turn up anything, California-based Institute for Canine Forensics sent two border collies and their owners to search the site. The dogs are trained to detect the scent of human bones buried for many years. A local resident who works for Southwest Airlines donated plane tickets to fly them from across the country, and business owners paid for lodging during their five-day stay, Wieners said.

    However, the dogs were unable to detect any remains. It was methodical digging that eventually completed the search.

    “We were looking at every bucket and had been for weeks on end, thinking that every bucket was going to be the one where we located something,” Rogers said.

    After 25 days of digging in Houston, a La Marque police officer spotted what appeared to be bones in an excavator bucket pulled from the ground on the afternoon of March 18. The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences confirmed the remains were human and recovered the bones from the ground. On April 14, the University of North Texas Health Science Center confirmed they belonged to Cain.

    In the meantime, the multiagency team returned to Brazoria County, where they found remains confirmed to be Cox’s on April 1.

    Harrell Gill-King directs the laboratory of forensic anthropology at the Center for Human Identification at the University of North Texas. The center houses the FBI’s nationwide DNA database, a nationwide missing-person database and the forensic anthropology lab.

    Gill-King, who helped law enforcement during the investigation, called the size of the search areas “stunning.” He compared it to the size of archaeological dig sites the Middle East or mass graves from military conflicts in South America.

    Additionally, the high clay content of the soil — sometimes called black gumbo — doesn’t drain well, making it difficult to search, he said.

    “I’ve rarely seen that kind of motivation,” he said. “They were going to find her or else.”

    No charges have been filed against Reece in the deaths of Cox, Cain or Smither.

    Galveston County District Attorney Jack Roady said his prosecutors continue to coordinate the investigation with Brazoria, Denton and Oklahoma counties. Roady has said any charges related to Cain’s death would be prosecuted in Galveston County.

    Oklahoma County First Assistant District Attorney Scott Rowland, whose office charged Reece with murder and kidnapping, has said that Texas officials asked whether Reece could avoid the death penalty if he led investigators to Cain’s remains. The office made no such promises and would have no decision on seeking the death penalty against Reece until he is extradited to Oklahoma for his arraignment in Johnston’s killing, Rowland said.

    Investigators have been gathering evidence from the past 19 years, and they’re wrapping up that process, Roady said. However, Roady did not disclose a potential timeline for when charges would be filed.

    ___

    Information from: The Galveston County Daily News, http://www.galvnews.com

    http://www.abqjournal.com/766792/new...ve-search.html

  7. #7

    Default Re: William Reece

    Cold case involving 19-year-old Bethany girl moving forward, suspect charged

    A cold case is now moving forward after nearly two decades. The man accused of killing 19-year-old Tiffany Johnston was in court. Prosecutors charged William Reece in the kidnapping of Johnston, from Bethany, in 1997.


    Video: http://www.koco.com/news/cold-case-i...arged/40935936

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